New Boston University study:

'There is no association between potato consumption and elevated cardiometabolic disease risk'

A new study by Boston University researchers examined the influence of potatoes as part of overall diet and lifestyle patterns on cardiometabolic disease risk. They found no change in cardiometabolic risk factors associated with intake of either fried or non-fried potatoes in adults from the long-running Framingham Offspring cohort.

Lead study investigator Lynn L. Moore, DSc, MPH, associate professor of Medicine at the Boston University Chobanian & Avedisian School of Medicine: “In this study, we looked at the effects of higher intakes of potatoes on blood pressure, lipids, and glucose and we found that after accounting for other dietary and lifestyle factors, there was no increased risk of cardiometabolic disorders associated with potato consumption.”

“In fact, we found that those in the highest potato intake category consumed 25% more total fruits and vegetables than those in the lower potato intake group. As a result, these participants who consumed more potatoes were more likely to meet the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines.”

These study results indicate that potatoes, both fried and non-fried sweet and white potato varieties, can be included as part of a healthy diet without impacting risk factors for cardiometabolic disease. Further, potatoes contribute to total fruit and vegetable intake, thus enabling consumers to more closely align with the Dietary Guidelines recommendations.

Source: eurekalert.org


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